Learning Plans

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    Middle School Students
     
    A student learning plan is an academic plan.
    The parent and advisor work together to craft a plan of learning for the school year.
    The learning plan contains 6 parts:
    • Class Description
    • Learning Materials
    • Learning Goals
    • Learning Activities
    • Methods of Evaluation
    • Estimated Hours
    Each Fall a memo is published which updates parents of the current requirements of the student learning plans.
    Each learning plan is reviewed monthly by the advisor to determine if satisfactory progress is being made.
    The learning plan is flexible and can be adjusted through-out the year.
     
    Below is the current language that we strive for when writing a learning plan:
     
    Student Learning Plan Format A WSLP (or SLP) is a school year-long document describing each class (or course) a student takes, both at home and/or at school. On Wings, there are 6 parts to that course description, each in bold below, explained ​ with examples. See your advisor for assistance if needed!
     
    Box 1 Course Description: Cut and paste the following sentence (in red), filling in the two blanks with ​ appropriate information.
     
    This year-long course covers the grade content noted below. Weekly certificated contact will be completed through direct personal contact with an HQ/certificated teacher in an on-site HC class. At least one state standard will be covered in this course. An example is, "This year-long course covers the 4th grade math content noted below. Weekly certificated contact will be completed through direct personal contact held in an on-site HC class. At least one state standard will be covered in this course.
     
    Box 2 Learning Materials: List curriculum, books, supplies, materials, websites, and other instructional items ​ used for this course. Do not include faith-based instructional materials. Cut and paste the following sentence in red and then complete it.
     
    The curriculum, books, supplies, materials, web-sites, and other sources used for this course are An example is: The curriculum, books, supplies, materials, web-sites, and other sources used for this course are Saxon 4th Grade Math Program, the Khan Academy and Math Mammoth web sites, Can't Stop math game, and multiplication flash cards. Another example is: The curriculum, books, supplies, materials, web-site, and other sources used for the first semester of this course are the following 6th grade books (classics): The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain The Incredible Journey by Sheila Burnford Adam Of The Road by Elizabeth Janet Gray Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt Favorite Sherlock Holmes Detective Stories by Arthur Conan Doyle The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien The Witch Of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes The Diary Of Anne Frank by Anne Frank
     
    Box 3 Learning Goals: ​ First, note the lessons, units, or chapters that will be covered in the course, by month. Second, give general topics and primary learning content which will be covered in those lessons, units, chapters, or whole course.
     
    Examples follow: An example is Wordly Wise Book 2 (containing 15 lessons for the year) September = Lesson 1 and half of Lesson 2 October = Finish Lesson 2, Lesson 3 November = Lesson 4, ½ of Lesson 5 December = Finish Lesson 5, Lesson 6 January Lesson 7, ½ of Lesson 8 February = Finish Lesson 8, Lesson 9 March = Lesson 10, ½ of Lesson 11 April = Lesson 12, ½ of Lesson 13 May = Finish Lesson 13, Lesson 14 June = Lesson 15 Primary learning goals and topics covered in each and every lesson of this course are new vocabulary words and their meanings, reading comprehension, recognizing definitions, using new words in sentences, and applying the meanings of new words. Another example is Writing With Ease Level 4 Each week we’ll complete one lesson of the 36 lessons in this 36-​-week program, as follows. September: Lessons 1 -​- 3 October: Lessons 4 -​- 8 November: Lessons 9 -​- 11 December: Lessons 12 -​- 14 January: Lessons 15 -​- 18 February: Lessons 19 -​- 22 March: Lessons 23 -​- 26 April: Lessons 27 -​- 30 May: Lessons 31 -​- 34 June: Lessons 35 -​- 36 Primary learning goals and objectives covered in each of the 36 lessons of this course are Main Idea, dictation, selected literature reading, and reading comprehension.
     
    Another example is Math U See, Level Gamma There are 30 units in this 36 week program. We’ll cover approximately one unit per week, interspersing the extra 6 weeks for those concepts which need more time. Our rough schedule is: September: Units 1 & 2: Rectangles, Factors, Products October: Units 3 – 5: Skip Counting by 2, 5, 10; Multiply by 2; Quarts & Pints November: Units 4 – 7: Dime & Nickel, Multiply by 5, Area of Rectangle and Square December: Units 8 – 9: Solve For An Unknown, Skip Count by 9, Equivalent Fractions January: Units 10 – 14: Multiply And Skip Count by 9, 6 & 3, Foot & Yard, February: Units 15 n 18: Multiply & Skip Count by 4, 7 March: Units 19 – 22: Multiply & Skip Count by 8, Pints to Gallon, Multiple Digit Multiplication April: Units 23 – 26: Twon Digit time Twon Digit with/without regrouping, Finding Factors, 25 Cents May: Units 27 – 29: Place Value Through Millions, More Multiple Digit Multiplication, Prime/Comp. #’s June: Unit 30: Mile, Ton.
     
    Box 4 Learning Activities​: In this box you explain what the student will do to learn the concepts and/or cover the materials you’ve noted you’ll cover, above. Certificated teacher and parent ideas are encouraged. Cut and paste from examples below, if they are correct and appropriate to what is actually done in the course.
     
    An example is: Each day the student will complete a math lesson. They will have a new lesson/concept/learning explained, demonstrated/taught. They’ll complete practice problems to ensure understanding of content. They will have independent practice/homework over those concepts. They will re-do and correct any which they missed. When review is needed, we’ll not learn a new concept but take the time needed to re-teach or reinforce needed concepts. Another example is: The first four days of the week the student will complete a phonics lesson from the phonics curriculum mentioned above. The lesson will be taught to them, samples will be worked on the whiteboard or pencil & paper to make sure the student comprehends, and the student will then independently work through a daily assignment to make sure they understand and show the ability to complete the learning of the day. Any errors will be corrected. The fifth day of each week the student will learn to read by reading and being read to. This will include books from the list of books in the Learning Materials section above.
     
    Box 5 Progress Criteria/ Methods of Evaluation​: In this box tell how you will decide if the student is mastering the learning goals you listed in the learning goals section above. Please copy the sentence in red. Delete any evaluation activities your child does not do.
     
    Student monthly progress evaluation is made on the basis of weekly certificated contact, work samples, communications with students, communications with parents, and performance in on-site classes. It is electronically communicated to parents via WINGS. It is our goal that the student will accomplish approximately 10% of the goals of this course each month, September through June. The level of mastery expected is 70% or higher to progress. Methods of evaluation will include but are not limited to those below, under the direction of an HQ teacher: 1. observation and/or correction of daily and/or weekly work and progress 2. daily or weekly discussion of assignments, readings, writings 3. correction of work done incorrectly 4. portfolio kept of student work, at least weekly An example is: It is our goal that the student will accomplish approximately 10% of the goals of this course each month, September through June. The level of mastery expected is 70% or higher to progress. Methods of evaluation will include but are not limited to: 1. observation and/or correction of daily and/or weekly work and progress 2. daily or weekly discussion of assignments, readings, writings 3. correction of work done incorrectly 4. portfolio kept of student work, at least weekly 5. completion an oral review of work to check for understanding
     
    Box 6 Weekly Hours: ​In this small box place the number of hours that are anticipated for study in this course on a weekly basis. It is to be the averages. As an example, if you do this subject 5 days a week, ½ hour a day, put 2.5 hours. If it is a course that has 45 minutes a day for 4 days a week, put 3 hours.