Graduation Requirements

  • These are the current graduation requirements to earn a diploma through the Oak Harbor School District as directed in Board Policy 2410p. 

     High School Graduation Requirements: 

    Total Number of Credits Required 
     


    Class of:

    2020

    2021

    2022

    Class of 2023 and beyond

    Entering 9th grade after July 1 of:

    2016

    2017

    2018

    2019

    English

    4

    4

    4

    4

    Mathematics

    3

    3

    3

    3

    Science

    3

    3

    3

    3

    Social Studies

    3

    3

    3

    3

    Arts

    2

    2

    2

    2

    Health and Fitness

    2

    2

    2

    2

    Career and Tech Ed

    1

    1

    1

    1

    World Language

    2

    2

    2

    2

    Electives

    4

    4

    6.5

    8

    Total Required Credits:

    24

    24

    26.5

    28

     To ensure that students have an opportunity to partake in a broad variety of academic, occupational, cultural and recreational courses in order to enhance their quality of life in high school and in the future, students in the graduating class of 2022 and beyond will be required to earn additional credits above the 24 required by the State Board of Education.
     

    Subject and Credit Requirements for Graduation
     

    The following are the subject and credit requirements that a student must meet to graduate. With the exception of dual credit courses, at least one (1) course must be completed for each required credit below.

    1. Four credits in English: A student may recover .5 English Language Arts credit following a failed or incomplete English Language Arts course if a student meets standard on a (an):
      1. State assessment in English Language Arts;
      2. End-of-course exam from an English Language Arts course(where an end-of-course exam is available) Approved state alternative that meets the graduation requirement.
         
    2. Three credits in mathematics:
      1. The three mathematics credits must include Algebra I, Geometry, and a third credit of high school mathematics that aligns with the student’s interests and high school and beyond plan.
      2. A student who prior to ninth grade successfully completes one or more high school level math courses with a passing grade may use those credits to meet his or her graduation requirement.
      3. A student who prior to ninth grade successfully completes one or more high school level math courses with a passing grade and opts to receive no high school credit may do one of the following:
        1. Repeat the course or courses for credit in high school; or
        2. Earn three credits of high school mathematics in different math subjects than those completed before high school. The student must take Algebra I and Geometry but the student does not need to repeat courses if the student already took the courses at a high school level.
      4. A student may recover .5 math credit following a failed or incomplete math course if the student meets standard on a(an):
        1. State assessment in the equivalent math subject;
        2. End-of-Course exam for a math course (where an end-of-course exam is available);
        3. Another approved state alternative that meets the graduation requirement.
           
    3. Three credits in science:[HM1]
      1. Two science credits must be in laboratory science.
      2. A student may choose the content of the third science credit based on his or her interests and his or her high school and beyond plan, with agreement of the student’s parent or guardian. If the parent or guardian is unavailable or does not indicate a preference for a specific course, the school counselor or principal may provide agreement.
      3. A student may recover .5 science credit following a failed or incomplete science course if the student meets standard on a(an):
        1. State assessment in science;
        2. End-of-course exam for a science course (where an end-of-course exam is available);
        3. Another approved state alternative that meets the graduation requirement.
           
    4. Three credits in Social Studies:
      1. One credit must be in United States history or Advanced Placement US History;
      2. One-half credit must be Modern Global Economics or Advanced Placement Government and Politics;
      3. One-half credit must be in Civics or Advanced Placement Government and Politics;
      4. One credit must be in a World History or Advanced Placement World History;
      5. A student must receive Washington State history and government instruction.
         
    5. Two credits in the arts: One of the two arts credits may be replaced with a Personalized Pathway Requirement.
       
    6. Two credits in world languages or Personalized Pathway Requirements. “Personalized pathway requirement” means up to three credits chosen by a student that are included in a student’s personalized pathway and prepare the student to meet specific post-secondary career or educational goals.
      1. “Personalized pathway” is a locally determined body of coursework identified in a student’s high school and beyond plan that is deemed necessary to attain the post-secondary career or educational goals chosen by the student.
         
    7. One-half credit in health.
       
    8. One and one-half credit in physical education. Students may waive .5 credit of physical education per semester by meeting one of the following criteria:
      1. OSPI- Developed fitness assessment: .5 Concepts of Health and Fitness, .5 Fitness Planning
      2. District-Approved Fitness Plan/Portfolio(where available)
      3. Physical disability
      4. Employment
      5. Religious belief
      6. Participation in directed athletics
      7. Earning credit in Military Science (NJROTC)
      8. Other good cause
         
    9. One credit in Career and Technical Education.
      1. A career and technical education credit is a credit resulting from a course in a career and technical education program or an occupational education credit.
      2. A student who earns credit through a career and technical education course determined by the district or by the office of the superintendent of public instruction to be equivalent to a noncareer and technical education core course will not be required to pass a course in the noncareer and technical education subject to earn a credit in that subject. The student earns one credit while meeting two graduation requirements, a career and technical education requirement and the noncareer and technical education subject requirement. The total number of credits required for graduation remain unchanged, and the student will need to earn an additional elective credit.
         
    10. Elective credits.
      1. Classes of 2020 and 2021 4 elective credits
      2. Class of 2022 6.5 elective credits
      3. Class of 2023 and beyond 8 elective credits
      4. Students will earn .25 credits per year in Advisory for the purpose of developing their High School and Beyond Plan, Social Emotional Learning and other needs of the school community.

    High School and Beyond Plan Requirement

    Each student must have a high school and beyond plan to guide the student’s high school experience and inform course taking that is aligned with the student’s goal for education or training and career after high school.

    High school and beyond plans must be initiated for students during the seventh or eighth grade to guide their high school experience and prepare them for postsecondary education or training and their careers. In preparation for initiating a high school and beyond plan, each student must first be administered a career interest and skills inventory that will help inform the student’s ninth grade course taking and initial identification of his or her education and career goals.

    The district encourages parents and guardians to be involved in the process of developing and updating students’ high school and beyond plans.
     

    The high school and beyond plan will be developed and updated periodically through the advisory programs in grades 7- 12 to address the following:

    1. High school assessment results and junior year course-taking;
       
    2. A student’s changing interests, goals, and needs, including identifications of the graduation pathway options the student intends to complete to meet his or her educational and career goals; and
       
    3. Available interventions, academic supports, and courses that will enable the student to meet high school graduation requirements and graduation pathway requirements.

    For students with an individualized education program (IEP), the high school and beyond plan must be developed and updated in alignment with their IEP, but in a similar manner and with similar school personnel as for all other students.

     All high school and beyond plans will, at a minimum, include the following:

    1. Identification of career goals, aided by a skills and interest assessment;
       
    2. Identification of educational goals;
       
    3. Identification of dual credit programs and the opportunities they create for students, including eligibility for automatic enrollment in advanced classes under RCW 28A.320.195 Career and Technical Education programs, Running Start programs, AP courses, and College in the High School programs;
       
    4. Information about the College Bound scholarship program established in Chapter 28B.118 RCW;
       
    5. A four-year plan for course taking that does the following:
      1. Includes information about options for satisfying state and local graduation requirements;
      2. Satisfies state and local graduation requirements;
      3. Aligns with the student’s secondary and postsecondary goals, which can include education, training, and career;
      4. Identifies course sequences to inform academic acceleration, as described in RCW 28A.320.195, that include dual credit courses or programs and are aligned with the student’s goals; and
      5. Includes information about the College Bound scholarship program; and
      6. Evidence that the student has received the following information on federal and state financial aid programs that help pay for the costs of a postsecondary program;
        1. Information about the documentation necessary for completing the applications; application timelines and submission deadlines; the importance of submitting applications early; information specific to students who are or have been in foster care; information specific to students who are, or are at risk of, being homeless; information specific to students whose family member or guardian will be required to provide financial and tax information necessary to complete the application; and
        2. Opportunities to participate in sessions that assist students and, when necessary, their family members or guardians, fill out financial aid applications.
           
    6. Evidence that the student has received the following information on federal and state financial aid programs that help pay for the costs of a postsecondary program:
      1. Documentation necessary for completing financial aid applications, including at minimum the free application for federal student aid (FAFSA) or the Washington application for state financial aid (WASFA);
      2. Application timelines and submission deadlines;
      3. The importance of submitting applications early;
      4. Information specific to students who have been in foster care;
      5. Information specific to students who are, or are at risk of being, homeless;
      6. Information specific to students whose family member or guardians will be required to provide financial and tax information necessary to complete the application;
      7. Opportunities to participate in sessions that assist students—and when necessary, their family members or guardians—fill out financial aid applications;
      8. Information provided on the Washington student achievement council website concerning each of the state and federal financial aid applications in this subsection; and
      9. Information on college-bound scholarship application and eligibility; and
         
    7. By the end of the twelfth grade, a current resume or activity log that provides a written compilation of the student’s education, any work experience, and any community service and how the school district has recognized the community service.

    Students who have not earned a score of level three or four on the middle school math state assessment must include in their plan taking math courses in ninth and tenth grade.

     

    For students who have not earned a level three or four on their middle school English language arts exam or their middle school science exam, the district will inform them of supports and courses that will address their learning needs and be considered in their course-taking plans.

     

    For students meeting graduation requirements, their high school and beyond plans should be used to guide their choices of what their third credit of high school math and science will be.

    1. Graduation Pathway Options (https://www.sbe.wa.gov/our-work/graduation-pathway-options)

    A student may choose to pursue one or more of the pathway options described below to demonstrate career and college readiness as long as the option chosen is in alignment with the student’s high school and beyond plan.
     

    Statewide High School Assessment
     

    A student may demonstrate career and college readiness by meeting or exceeding the graduation standard established by the State Board of Education on the statewide high school assessments in English language arts and mathematics.

     Alternative Programs
     

    The district may grant credit toward graduation requirements for planned learning experiences primarily conducted away from the facilities owned, operated, or supervised by the district.
     

    A proposal for approval of out-of-school learning activities will be submitted prior to the experience, will be at no additional cost to the district, and will include at least the following information:

    1. The name of the program or planned learning experience;
       
    2. The length of time for which approval is desired;
       
    3. The objective(s) of the program;
       
    4. The learning goals and related learning requirements of the program experience;
       
    5. A description of how credits will be determined in accord with WAC 180-51-050(1);
       
    6. A description of how student performance will be assessed;
       
    7. The qualifications of instructional personnel; and
       
    8. The plans for evaluation of program.

    The district will keep a list of approved programs on file in the superintendent's office. The superintendent or designee will communicate the reasons for approval or disapproval to those making the request.

    Running Start

     The Running Start program allows high school juniors and seniors to attend community college classes (100 level or above) for part or all of their schedule. Students must be of junior standing or above to be eligible for the program. Students earn college credit, which is also converted and applied to their high school transcript.
     

    In order to enroll in the Running Start program, students need to do the following:

    1. Contact the college they are interested in attending and arrange to take the appropriate placement test. The test is offered at various times and results are often available the following day. Minimum scores in reading and writing are required.
       
    2. Speak with their counselor to assess credits needed for graduation, then decide which courses they would like to take at the college. Note that part-time Running Start students will need to coordinate college classes so that they do not interfere with their high school classes. Full-time Running Start students will not be enrolled in courses at the high school, even when the community college they attend is not in session.
       
    3. Obtain a Running Start authorization form from the college or their high school counselor. The counselor will sign the form after the student completes their portion. A parent signature is required if the student is under 18 years old.
       
    4. Take the authorization form to the college and register for classes. Once the classes are completed, the college will notify the high school and credits will be added to the student’s transcript.

    Credit for Career and Technical Work-Based Learning
     The district regards work experience as a part of the educational program of students as part of the secondary school curriculum rather than just a device to relieve a staffing shortage. The district may grant credit for work experience based upon the following factors:

    1. The school will supervise the work program.
       
    2. The work experience will specifically relate to the student’s school program.
       
    3. The work experience will represent growth in the student, and the type of work will have definite educational value.
       
    4. The work experience will provide a varied job experience.
       
    5. The career placement counselor will supplement the work experience with an adequate program of guidance, placement, follow-up, and coordination between job and school.
       
    6. The work experience may be a planned part of the credit given for a school subject (e.g., sales training class).
       
    7. The district may grant one credit for not less than one hundred eighty hours for instructional work based learning experience and not less than three hundred sixty hours of cooperative work based learning experience related to a student’s school program.
       
    8. The employer will legally employ the student who must have passed his or her sixteenth birthday.
       
    9. The employer will file a report of the student's work record with the school, indicating the student made satisfactory progress on the job.
       
    10. The regular state apprenticeship program and school cooperatively develop the student’s training, which meets graduation requirements standards.
       
    11. The program standards and procedures align with the state career and technical work based learning standards.

    National Guard High School Career Training

     The district may grant credit for National Guard high school career training in lieu of either required or elective high school credits. Approval by the district will be obtained prior to a student's participation in a National Guard training program as follows:

    1. MIL Form 115 or an equivalent form provided by the National Guard will be completed and filed with the school district; and
       
    2. The number of credits toward high school graduation to be granted will be calculated, agreed upon by the student, and an authorized representative of the school district, and such agreement noted on MIL Form 115 or such equivalent form.
       
    3. The district may grant credit toward high school graduation upon certification by a National Guard training unit commander that the student has met all program requirements.

    Home School Credit

    Guidelines for granting high school credit for homeschooling are as follows:

    1. To gain credit for a course of study, a student will provide:
      1. A journal that reflects the actual work completed during a home-study course of study;
      2. Exhibit(s) of any specific projects completed (e.g., themes, research papers, art and/or shop projects); or
      3. Any such other performance-based exhibits of specific course-related accomplishments.
         
    2. To gain credit for a course of study, a student must demonstrate proficiency at a minimum of 80 percent of the objectives of the course. Such testing will be available as an ancillary service of the district if it is regularly available to all students. If not, the parent may engage district-approved personnel to conduct such an assessment at a cost determined by such personnel.
       
    3. Credit is granted for the following approved schools:
      1. Community colleges, vocational-technical institutes, four-year colleges and universities, and approved private schools in the state of Washington, and
      2. Other schools or institutions that are approved by the district after evaluation for a particular course offering.